David Pearson workshop on ‘Provenance in Books’

speccoll
Friday 15 December 2017

On 21-22 November, Special Collections welcomed David Pearson, former Director of Culture, Heritage & Libraries for the City of London Corporation and author of Provenance Research in Book History (1994), English Bookbinding Styles (2005) and Books as History (2008), for a workshop on provenance in printed books. Over the course of two days, staff, students and academics were treated to a full programme of sessions ranging from the general principles of provenance, through annotations, palaeography, bookplates and heraldry. Pearson illustrated his sessions using examples gleaned from the St Andrews University Library collections which he had selected in an intensive research day in the stacks with Elizabeth Henderson, Rare Books Librarian.

An example of manuscript additions and a dried plant sample, found in an 18th century gardening manual.
A discussion regarding the content of some particularly difficult annotations and ownership inscriptions – palaeographers never agree!
The end paper of a small volume is projected onto the large screen.

On the evening of the 21st, Pearson delivered a well-attended public lecture at Parliament Hall on The Value of Historic Bookbindings: A St Andrews Perspective, which highlighted the uniqueness of the bindings of early printed books and how they can contribute to our knowledge of not just the history of a specific book, but also the history of how previous owners or readers encountered texts as they were passed through from hand to hand. By preserving, cataloguing and making available to readers the rare books in Special Collections, the University of St Andrews Library is taking part in the vital work of extending knowledge of unique heritage materials.

Attendees of the public lecture were treated to a small exhibition of beautiful and varied bindings from the Library’s Special Collections.
One of the most interesting bindings at St Andrews is a 1511 Rouen printing of the Vulgate which is thought to be the foundation bible for St Leonard’s College. It still has a metre of chain attached to its original binding, once used to fix the valuable book to a lectern for consultation. This bible was possibly bound in the Augustinian Priory of St Andrew. Bib BS75.B11

The intensive focus on bindings and related topics over these two days was a valuable training experience for Special Collections staff. The Masters students who attended were fascinated by the opportunity to engage with an eminent expert in his field and those academics who attended were encouraged and perhaps surprised to see the depth and richness of the examples that David had been able to identify. We are most grateful to him for his taking the time to visit St Andrews.

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One reply to "David Pearson workshop on ‘Provenance in Books’"

  • James Gray
    Tuesday 19 December 2017, 5.45pm

    Reblogged this on jamesgray2 and commented: The Value of Historic Bookbindings: A St Andrews Perspective, which highlighted the uniqueness of the bindings of early printed books and how they can contribute to our knowledge of not just the history of a specific book, but also the history of how previous owners or readers encountered texts as they were passed through from hand to hand.

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